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Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

1 edition of brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin. found in the catalog.

brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin.

brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin.

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Published by HMSO. in Edinburgh .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14397112M

Home» News and Blogs» Off the Beaten Track 11 - In search of Brochs Off the Beaten Track 11 - In search of Brochs. Published: 12 June Brochs are the best known of Shetland’s prehistoric remains and Mousa is regarded as iconic throughout Scotland. In spite of their popularity, brochs are still shrouded in mystery. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE. MOUSA BROCH. We continually revise our Statements of Significance, so they may vary in length, format and level of detail. While every effort is made to.

For example, the playback census on Mousa in gave a mean estimate of approximat pairs, but applying 95% confidence limits gave an estimated range of 8,–17, pairs. With such an imprecise estimate, it is difficult to detect population change between censuses. Booking is required for this trip Book Now. DATES FOR Brochs, meaning strong or fortified places in Old Norse, are massive, circular, double skinned, drystone towers that would have dominated the landscape of Iron Age Northern and Western Scotland. Those in Mousa, built more than 2, years ago, were exceptional feats of .

  The brochs of Mousa & Clickhimin by John Robertson Campbell Hamilton 1 edition - first published in Not in Library. Subjects. History, Accessible book, Anglo-Saxons, Brochs, Civilization, Juvenile literature, Middle Ages, Mines and mineral resources. The Broch of Mousa is the finest preserved example of a broch in Europe because it has one of the thickest recorded walls, the smallest interior and a remote location! It stands at m high, has a base which is 15m in diameter, and an interior which is only 6m in diameter.


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Brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin by Hamilton, John and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The Brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin, Shetland Paperback – January 1, by Stewart CRUDEN (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Pamphlet "Please retry" — Author: Stewart CRUDEN. This book examines some of the most spectacular ancient monuments in Britain - the iron age brochs of north and west Scotland.

It sets the building of these unique fortifications into context and examines some of the impressive sites that may still be visited, including the brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin in Shetland and Carolway on by: 1. The Broch of Clickimin (also Clickimin Broch) is a large, well-preserved but restored broch in Lerwick in Shetland, Scotland (grid reference).Originally built on an island in Clickimin Loch, it was approached by a stone broch is situated within a walled enclosure and, unusually for brochs, features a large "forework" or "blockhouse" between the opening in the enclosure and the Location: Mainland, Shetland.

Mousa Broch may be the most well preserved on Shetland, but the Broch of Clickimin is certainly the most easily accessible. About BC a bronze-age family built a small farmhouse on a grassy islet surrounded by loch or marsh, and they walled the islet to enclose their cattle and sheep.

Softback. SBN 11 0 1st. Twin stapled booklet with fold-out wraps with plans of each broch. illus. & with Front cover titles. " x ". ii pp. + 46 pp. Glossy paper production with B/W photos, & B/W line-drawn reconstructions by Alan Sorrell. Wt: Kg. Good. This book examines some of the most spectacular ancient monuments in Britain: the iron age brochs of north and west Scotland.

It places the building of these unique fortifications in context and examines some of the impressive sites that may still be visited, including the brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin in Shetland and Carloway on s: 5.

This book examines some of the most spectacular ancient monuments in Britain: the iron age brochs of north and west Scotland.

It places the building of these unique fortifications in context and examines some of the impressive sites that may still be visited, including the brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin in Shetland and Carloway on Lewis.

The broch tower still stands to an impressive height and the whole promontory is enclosed by a stout wall. Once inside, the enigmatic blockhouse rises up in front of the broch itself. To the west of the broch tower are the remains of a number of different structures dating from around BC to AD.

Clickimin Broch is sited on a promontory projecting into the Loch of Clickimin. Before the water level was lowered inthe site was connected to the mainland by a narrow causeway, probably constructed in the later Iron Age.

The remains of the causeway can still be seen today. The promontory at. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Previous edition: Description: 31 pages: illustrations, 1 map, plans ; 21 cm.

Series Title. This book examines some of the most spectacular ancient monuments in Britain: the iron age brochs of north and west Scotland.

It places the building of these unique fortifications in context and examines some of the impressive sites that may still be visited, including the brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin in Shetland and Carloway on Lewis.

There is a short section on what brochs are not. The brochs of Mousa & Clickhimin. [John Robertson Campbell Hamilton] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Book: All Authors / Contributors: John Robertson Campbell Hamilton.

Find more information about: ISBN: Clickhimin Broch is situated on the south shore of the Loch of Clickhimin, three-quarters of a mile south-west of Lerwick on the Lerwick-Sumburgh road.

Mousa Broch is situated on the west shore of the island of Mousa, opposite Sandwick, 15 miles south of Lerwick on the Lerwick-Sumburgh road.

Access is by motor boat hired from Leebatten, Sandwick. Broch of Mousa (or Mousa Broch) is a preserved Iron Age broch or round tower. It is on the island of Mousa in Shetland, is the tallest broch still standing and amongst the best-preserved prehistoric buildings in is thought to have been constructed c.

BC, and is one of more than brochs built in Scotland. The Mousa broch features prominently in two Norse Sagas, one about a man who finds it hard to retrieve his captive mother from the fortress, and one about a young couple, shipwrecked while eloping.

Broch of Mousa Broch of Mousa (or Mousa Broch) is the finest preserved example of an Iron Age broch or round tower. It is in the small island of Mousa in Shetland, Scotland.

It is the tallest broch still standing and amongst the best-preserved prehistoric buildings in Europe. Clickimin Broch (Broch) on The Modern Antiquarian, the UK & Ireland's most popular megalithic community website.

8 images, 4 fieldnotes, 1 weblink, plus information on many more ancient sites nearby and across the UK & Ireland. The Broch of Clickimin is a large, well-preserved but restored broch in Lerwick in Shetland, Scotland.

Originally built on an island in Clickimin Loch, it was approached by a stone causeway. The broch is situated within a walled enclosure and, unusually for brochs, features a large "forework" or "blockhouse" between the opening in the enclosure.

Origin and definition. The word broch is derived from Lowland Scots 'brough', meaning (among other things) fort. In the midth century Scottish antiquaries called brochs 'burgs', after Old Norse borg, with the same names in Scandinavian Scotland such as Burgawater and Burgan show that Old Norse borg is the older word used for these structures in the north.

The Origin and Development of the Broch and Wheelhouse Building Cultures of the Scottish Iron Age - Volume 31 - Euan W. MacKie ‘ Notes of the Brochs or “Pictish Towers” of Mousa, Clickhimin, ‘ The Broch of Mousa: a Survey by H.M.

Office of Works ’, PSAS.Buy {BROCHS OF SCOTLAND BY Ritchie, J. N. G.(Author)}Brochs of Scotland[paperback]Shire Publications(Publisher) by Ritchie, J. N. G.

(ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.This book examines some of the most spectacular ancient monuments in Britain - the iron age brochs of north and west Scotland.

It sets the building of these unique fortifications into context and examines some of the impressive sites that may still be visited, including the brochs of Mousa and Clickhimin in Shetland and Carolway on Lewis/5(2).